Snapshot of projects Halpin closed in 2014

ARCOPOL

The ARCOPOL PLATFORM project builds on the success of the ARCOPOL+ project recently completed in the Halpin Centre. The project is concerned with combating oil and Harmful Noxious Substance (HNS) spills through technology transfer, training and innovation. The project’s aim is to reinforce the preparedness and response to oil and HNS spills in Atlantic Regions.

For further information see: http://www.arcopol.eu/

PERSEUS

The FP7 funded PERSEUS project contributed to Europe’s efforts at monitoring illegal
migration and combating related crime and goods smuggling, by demonstrating an EU
Maritime surveillance ‘system of systems’, and building on existing national systems and platforms, but enhanced with innovations.

For further information see: http://www.perseus-fp7.eu/

DARIUS

The DARIUS project (Deployable Search and Rescue Integrated Chain with Unmanned
Systems) delivered a technical system capable of integrating unmanned systems in
the overall command and control cycle of both sea and land going search and rescue
operations, considering various scenarios where operators require the intervention of
multiple agencies in a multi-national context. NMCI’s simulator suite was used for one of
these demonstrations.

For further information see: http://www.nmci.ie/darius

Atlantic Power

The ERDF Interreg funded project Atlantic Power Cluster is providing Ireland with ample
opportunity, through a signed Accord, to engage with the offshore renewables industry
across Europe. The purpose of Atlantic Power is to enhance the potential for cooperation in Marine Renewable Energy (MRE – offshore wind, wave, tidal energy generation) across the Atlantic Area, which spans from Scotland, through the coasts of France, Spain and Portugal. One of the products developed during the project was an online database of the MRE supply chain that can be used by prospective developers. Galway County Council also engineered tools for developing a social acceptance of MRE amongst local communities,while the Halpin Centre looked at the future of training for this emerging industry.

For more information see: http://www.nmci.ie/atlanticpowercluster

NETMAR

NETMAR involved a full-scale demonstration in the Shannon for the evaluation and
dissemination of new robotic systems, sensors and networking technologies in maritime
incidents endangering human life, the environment and economic activities. NETMAR sought to exploit the fact that robotic vehicles provide new capabilities to operate in dull, dirty and dangerous environments while networking technologies enable the orchestration of existing assets with new robotic systems and sensors for enhanced
situational awareness and intervention over inter-operated networks.

For more information see: http://project-netmar.eu/about-netmar/objectives

AUXNAVALIA +

The Auxnavalia+ project aimed to enhance the innovation capacity of the shipbuilding
ancillary industry through, for example, safety and security based on structured
management and planning; stimulation and supporting of knowledge transfer between
research centers and SMEs; securing the long-term sustainability of the sector and
contributing to the Atlantic Area to become a quality global player by helping it to be more competitive in the global market.

For further information see: http://auxnavaliaplus.org/english/partners/

SMACS

Rapidly changing climate in the Arctic brings new challenges in maritime safety for both
indigenous and non-indigenous small craft crew. Many sailors are now drawn to explore
the previously inaccessible arctic regions, but run into trouble with inadequate preparation and training for the extreme conditions which still exist. In turn, Arctic search and rescue services must deal with a greater number and diversity of small craft emergencies over a much wider geographic range. SMACS (Small Craft Emergency Response and Survival Training for Arctic Conditions) was a Northern Periphery Programme funded collaborative international project with a primary objective to develop a safety and survival training programme, focused on the needs of small-craft mariners on commercial, fishing and leisure vessels operating in the harsh Arctic maritime regions. The Halpin Centre, in collaboration with Cork Institute of Technology’s NIMBUS Centre and partners from Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, produced a library of training modules such as weather and meteorology; safety and survival; Arctic seamanship, and communications. There is also a module on being a good Arctic citizen for learning about life in the Arctic and having respect for the environment. The training programme is accessible via an iPhone app through http://smacs-project.eu/ and is currently being developed for Android.

For further information see: http://smacs-project.eu/

SECILE

SECILE (Securing Europe through Counter-Terrorism: Impact, Legitimacy, and
Effectiveness) was a part-EU funded project of assembled European human rights and legal research experts tasked with exploring the true impact of European counter-terrorism policy since 2001. In the first European project of its kind, the project looked to assess and understand the extent to which various actors have been impacted by counter-terrorism legislation in Europe – from the citizen, to the legislator, to the security services, and the domestic courts. Managing the Halpin Centre’s role in SECILE was Lieutenant Commander Erika Downing who was able to use the opportunity to undertake a Masters in law. This is an example of how the Halpin Centre facilitates the development of personnel from the core partners of the National Maritime College of Ireland.

For further information see: http://secile.eu/